MS symptoms can include muscle stiffness, numbness, tingling or muscle weakness - Oren Zarif


MS symptoms can include muscle stiffness, numbness, tingling or muscle weakness - Oren Zarif
MS symptoms can include muscle stiffness, numbness, tingling or muscle weakness - Oren Zarif

MS symptoms are often confused with other health conditions. A person who has MS is still very much able to live a full life, but has difficulty doing so because of his or her limited ability to function. This disease takes control over the nervous system of individuals with MS. Here are some of the most commonly asked questions about MS symptoms.


What are the symptoms of MS? MS symptoms can include muscle stiffness, numbness, tingling or muscle weakness (sometimes just a little bit). MS symptoms can also come and go over time, and vary in intensity. They can either be light, moderate, or extremely severe. Some of the more common MS symptoms include: headaches, fatigue, irritability, depression, speech problems, balance issues, trouble with moving, trouble with speech, urinary frequency, bladder control, and sexual dysfunction. These are just a few of the many possible symptoms that MS patients may experience.



Does numbness affect my MS? MS numbness occurs for a variety of reasons. It may be because the nerves have been damaged, or because of inflammation. It may also occur because MS sufferers have taken medications that inhibit nerve impulses. MS symptoms may be a little bit more serious if the numbness occurs all of the time and is accompanied by weakness, tingling or muscle weakness.


Can you use MS medication to help with your symptoms? It is possible to use MS drugs to help manage your MS symptoms. However, it is important to remember that MS treatment should be done according to your doctor's recommendations and any side effects that you experience. You should not start any new medication without first talking to your doctor or health care provider.



What can I do about depression when I'm trying to treat my MS symptoms? While depression is common among MS sufferers, there are several ways to help combat depression while still managing your MS symptoms. One important thing to note is that you should never attempt to treat the depression while you're still using MS medication. This is because your MS may make depression worse, or you could damage one of your vital organs.


What can an MS nurse do for my MS symptoms? A MS nurse is an excellent person to turn to for advice and assistance regarding your MS symptoms. The primary goal of an MS nurse is to ensure that you are getting the very best care possible while maximizing your overall comfort and health.



What can an MS nurse do for me? A MS nurse is an excellent person to turn to for advice and assistance regarding your MS symptoms. The primary goal of an MS nurse is to ensure that you are getting the very best care possible while maximizing your overall comfort and health. The health of your nervous system depends on two things - good nutrition and regular exercise.


How does an MS symptom affect my nutrition? When your nervous system is disrupted, it can affect many things in your body. For instance, the quality of your skin and hair suffer, and you may also have trouble digesting foods. Your eyesight can be negatively affected and your ability to hear, talk, and think becomes poorer. These are only a few of the effects of demyelination of the central nervous system, and your MS doctor will be able to give you the most effective treatment for your symptoms based on your specific needs.


How can I treat my common symptoms of multiple sclerosis? Although multiple sclerosis often affects people in their forties or older, the vast majority of sufferers start showing signs of the disease at a younger age. If you exhibit signs of the disease before you are forty years old, your doctor may advise you to take vitamin D supplements to help you fight the common symptoms of MS. Vitamin D is important in regulating your immune system and helping the body digest and absorb nutrients. If you have been exposed to UV light from the sun, your body will not be able to properly absorb vitamin D. If you lack vitamin D, your body may compensate by producing more of its own, resulting in a calcium deficiency that can contribute to muscle weakness and fatigue.



Can I treat my symptoms of MS with medicine or with my diet alone? It is entirely possible to treat your MS symptoms with no medicine or no dietary changes at all. If you begin to experience any of the symptoms of MS listed above, but they do not interfere with your daily activities, you may experience mild cases of MS stiffness and pain and loss of muscle control, which will subside as your body gets used to living with MS. You may experience occasional spasticity and loss of muscle control, but these typically clear up on their own after about a year.


Some people experience severe MS symptoms, including severe pain, fatigue, and a loss of ability to move or perform normal daily tasks. These symptoms are usually caused by damage to the nerves or parts of the brain that control muscle movement or function. If your spasticity or other MS symptoms do not improve over a year, you should talk to your doctor about possible surgery, steroid injections, or other treatment options that can help relieve your MS pain, fatigue, and muscle weakness. In many cases, it is possible to control or manage your MS symptoms without the use of drugs, medicines, or surgery.

Oren Zarif - Psychokinesis